Beach Sentinels

Beach Sentinels by Wendy Roberts

There is a type of weather that happens right before a small summer squall that is fleeting but beautiful.  The sun glistens on low, choppy waves that glitter like sequins under a spotlight.  Offshore islands fall into dark purple shadow.  This contrast makes the ocean look particularly surreal.  It emphasizes the green tones in the waves and creates a creamy turquoise color as the waters are churned with oxygen.    This will be a short refreshing storm that will make the hot sand smell damp.   It will finish in a sun shower as rain and sun combine in diamond drops on every leaf. Perhaps there will be a rainbow arcing across the sky.  The forecast is in front of your eyes if you know the beach well. 

How many summer squalls have these trees seen?  How many waves have they heard rushing ashore?  When I see weathered trees along a coastline, I think of them as sentinels – guards for the approaching wind, waves, and storms from the sea.  The boughs of these trees at Kalama beach are sculpted by wind, the flow of air made solid.  Their roots are protecting the shore, holding on to grains of sand although it seems an impossible task.  It is a marvel to me that anything can grow in the sand and the heat of the beach.  Despite the sparse nutrients and the blazing afternoon sun, they provide shade and protect against wind and erosion.

This oil panting will be at the newly elegant and refreshing Lion Coffee Cafe (1555 Kalani St, Honolulu, HI 96817) which has been newly remodeled.  If you are on Oahu, you can have a cup of coffee and a cookie or pastry and enjoy the show anytime Monday – Saturday from 6 AM to 5 PM between now and June 30, 2018.

Hawaiian Floral for Lei Day

Happy Lei Day & May Day! I just finished a painting celebrating Hawaiian Flowers.  These are all flowers that were here long before humans found the remote beauty of Hawaii.

On the left is the vivid magenta flower stalk of the rare and gorgeous Lobelia gaudichaudii plant which grows only in high in the mountains of Oahu. In the center, peach-colored  ‘ie’ie (freycinetia arbora), is the focal point.  It is a high elevation vine that climbs the massive trees and cliffsides spreading bursts of long, thin leaves along a robust woody vine. Below that, the delicate yellow flowers of ilima, (Sida fallax) are the official flower  of Oahu (every island has a special flower as a symbol on lei day).  Ilima grows from the beaches up to the mountains and makes a wonderful landscape plant!  Speaking of official flowers, Hawaii Island’s official flower, ohia, the tree which is among the first to grow forth from the barren lava, is just to the right of the ie ie.  I chose the rare orange ohia blossom to continue the orange tones.  Ohai (Sesbania tomentosa) is in the bottom right corner and would be wonderful to plant in your yard if you live in the drier parts of the island.  If you are on Oahu, check with the specialty native plant nursery, Hui O Ka Maoli Ola – they will have it (and ilima) or will know where to get it and will probably be able to advise whether it is a good choice for your yard.  Finally, rare endangered Hawaiian tree-thistle (Hesperomannia arbuscula) incorporates all three major floral colors to complete the composition.

Thank you to Nate Yuen for his excellent blog http://hawaiianforest.com/ where I have learned so much about these gorgeous plants!  If you want to have a more beautiful Facebook feed, follow him and enjoy the gorgeous photos he takes.

This painting is currently on the wall of the newly renovated Lion Coffee Cafe in Kalihi (1555 Kalani St, Honolulu, HI 96817).  They have generously provided space on their large wall with special lighting and hanging systems specifically for artists to show and sell work. It’s a new venue for artists on Oahu, which is very exciting.  I helped them design the hanging system and have become the first artist in the space to “break it in”.  It’s been a fantastic experience!  It’s a wonderful place to get a cup of coffee and a delicious bite to eat as you see the art on the wall. I will have my work there for two months, ending on June 30, 2018.

Ultra Exhibit I

Ultra Exhibit I at Pauahi Tower Lobby
(lobby is the second floor – up the escalators)
Dates: March 3 – August 3, 2018
Open from 6 am – 6 pm on weekdays, Saturdays 8 am – 2 pm; Closed Sunday
Location: 1003 Bishop St, Honolulu, HI 96813
Parking entrance is on the left at approximately 1080 Alakea Street (Bishop Square Parking), or you may park in public parking at Alii Place across the street if you prefer a slightly cheaper option with a small walk.
Artists Reception: Thursday, May 17, 4 pm – 6 pm

Peaceful Sanctuary

Three of my art pieces are in the Ultra Exhibit at Pauahi Tower.  The Ultra Exhibit is named for the large pieces and the unusually long time period in this “ultra” venue – Pauahi Tower, which has a gorgeous travertine marble lobby with soaring ceilings somewhere greater than 20 feet high. We are so thankful to Douglas Emmett and the Pauahi Security team for their permission and support for this show, and to Katherine Love, our curator who ranked and juried the pieces so that we had an impartial decision of which pieces were on display first.
 

Shama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree

Shama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree

I serve as show chair for this very long show – it will be 5 months for stage I and at least 5 months for stage II (which will be entitled Ultra Exhibit II).  It’s been an experience that has cemented my confidence in organizing and running a large show, and it continues to take time and ingenuity to readjust the way the art is hung with every sale (because of frequent sales which is absolutely wonderful!)  I don’t put the new art in the same place as the one that just sold.  An show is about the way pieces interact with the neighboring images.  Every piece deserves a chance to be seen, so the paintings must be carefully arranged and re-arranged to give a harmonious grouping where every piece draws your eye in turn. I find on average that I can usually find a way to move three or four pieces to ensure the best look to the show, but it’s very tricky to know which pieces will look good together. I decided to use Photoshop to aid me in my quest for the best hanging scheme.   I have scale models of each wall and all 60+ pieces in the show.  I use them like digital paper dolls to arrange the work.  It saves me hours – especially since I am unable to see every wall at the same time.  This is a vast display space! 

Sacred Space

The public is invited to come to our reception. There are 27 artists in the show. I am not sure if they will all be able to come, but I hope so! If you would like to come but you don’t know what an art show is like, don’t let it intimidate you. You can read my handy guide to attending a reception here: How to Attend an Artists Reception  Below I have posted a handy postcard with all the info you need to join us. We will hope to see you there!

Easy Paint Party: Waterlilies

I am teaching an easy, fun, paint party themed around an interpretation of one of Monet’s recurring color schemes.

Brilhante Custom Framing and Art
1247 Kailua Rd #2a in Kailua
May 12, 2018 starting at 5:00 pm
Call to reserve a spot:  (808) 263-1096  

Pricing is $45 (plus or minus $5 – Brilhante can confirm the exact price).  This time we will be replicating a color harmony present in one of Monet’s waterlily paintings.  We will work on color mixing and painting wet in wet.  That is extra challenging in acrylic with its quick dry time. Acrylic is versatile and can act like watercolor or oil paint depending on how you handle it.  I will be sharing tips and tricks to get your paint to behave a little more like oil paint for the majority of this painting.  Most of all, we will aim to be joyful and expressive with our strokes, perfect for a fun and easy night.

Monet painted around 250 waterlily paintings.  They usually feature a large view of his exquisite garden.  Someone said he was a “gardener who could also paint”.  I found that quite a delightful description of his massive skill with the garden.  Because we are making this easy, we are going to “zoom in” and focus on two flowers and some lily pads with just a hint of peachy clouds at the top. 

There are a myriad of sophisticated color combos in Monet’s gorgeous paintings, but I chose a pinks/greens/blues scheme, focusing especially on the bottom of this painting:

These similar blues, greens and pinks appear in other works as well, so I think he was rather fond of this bright and lovely color relationship. The top of this next painting is nearly identical in color.

Image credit: Google Arts and Culture  https://artsandculture.google.com/asset/water-lilies/1QFVEEzvlmrVzg

Here is a softer, lighter version that is still a similar relationship of colors, especially near the bottom right corner: Image Credit:  Painting “Nympheas” by Claude Monet – Neue Pinakothek, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3334951

 

Project: Enchanted Forest Mural

The “Enchanted Forest” is a bedroom mural on all wall surfaces, and the ceiling as well, featuring glow-in-the-dark painted fireflies and a plethora of flowers. The setting is intended to feel like twilight in a magical forest garden with a limited, soothing palette.

Enchanted Forest: I designed the room with the position of the bed in mind. If you are sitting on the bed, or laying down looking toward your feet, this is the main wall. It’s also got the least furniture, so it contains the most detail. 

A progress photo showing my eventual containers of color. I mixed small batches of paint that I could use as a mixing shortcut and to keep my colors consistent from wall to wall. I wanted to create harmony by using a limited color palette especially since it's a bedroom mural.

A progress photo of the left lily pond showing my paint set-up.

Because there is a huge closet on one end of the room, windows opposite, and a door in a certain configuration, there is only one way that the furniture can be arranged in the room.  That made it really easy to plan the optimal vantage points, and to know where to lavish details that were not going to be obscured by furniture.

I never did share all my photos from the Enchanted Forest Mural before this, because it is being renovated and the moulding isn’t up and new windows are pending as well, but it’s time to share it anyway. I used a lot of tips and tricks for this mural that I learned from Mural Joe, one of my favorite teachers on YouTube.  I highly recommend his videos – they are wonderful!  Recently I posted on his channel to thank him for his help and he asked to see the mural.  Even though the photos show that the home was/is in renovation (there is a lack of moulding and lightswitch panels, etc…) you can see the painting well.  I will post again in a few months when all the finishing details are in place.

Enchanted Forest Mural: A palm painted over three surfaces to soften the corner

A palm painted over three surfaces to soften the corner

This photo tour will travel clockwise, through the room.  The prior three photos display the main wall – the wall with the lily pond and waterfall.  This is the wall seen when lying in bed.  It has less furniture than any other wall, so it needed the most lavish details.

The second wall spans the door and is mostly a narrow two-foot-wide panel because the entire rest of the wall is a big closet. These photos show the transition from the lily pond and waterfall wall to wall #2, the lilac and iris garden.

Clockwise: A detail of the right end of the lily wall wrapping around to the lilac garden – there is a closet next to the lilac garden.

Enchanted Forest Mural The wall with the massive tree and and a view over a misty cloud forest

The wall with the massive tree and and a view over a misty cloud forest

The third wall is the one behind the bed. Because of this, it has the most furniture obscuring it. I kept the bottom of the wall very simple, but I still made it beautiful because the furniture might change someday if it turns into an office.

The room also needs to have visual interest that extends onto the ceiling so that there is something to look at while lying in bed staring at the ceiling. I love to relax under a tree in the summer – I do not do that very often, but I wanted to give this room that illusion of looking up at the tree canopy when the viewer is lying in bed.  There is a beautiful fan that echoes the style of the room, so I didn’t want to compete with it. The tree ends before conflicting with the fan, but allows for a lot of detail on the sweet spot of the ceiling over the bed where the sleeper will end up staring a lot.

Detail of the right edge of the massive tree, looking off of a cliff over the forest canopy

Enchanted Forest Mural: The massive tree. When the bed is in place, the viewer is lying directly under the tree. The perspective is designed to make the tree look like it is disappearing up into the sky. It is surprisingly effective in person!

The massive tree. When the bed is in place, the viewer is directly under the tree. The perspective is designed to make the tree look like it is disappearing up into the sky. It is surprisingly effective in person!

An ancient path to a mysterious door in a tree. This part of the mural is between the two windows in the room.

Enchanted Forest Mural: An ancient path to a mysterious door in a tree

The final wall is a mysterious ancient path to an archway door.  The door is set into a tree that appears to be hundreds of years old.  Hopefully it prompts an imaginative journey – where does the door in the old tree lead? To the right of the path, the edge of the lily pond begins, and the mural has fully wrapped around the room.  On every wall, there are fireflies painted with the strongest glow-in-the-dark water-based pigment money can buy.  It is really cool to turn off the lights and see the fireflies glow green.

Enchanted Forest Mural: The massive tree and the ancient path. The old windows are in the process of being replaced.

This photo is from “in progress” when the  massive tree was 70% complete (no branches on the ceiling yet) and the ancient path walls complete.  I computer-generated “moulding” to mock up how it may look someday, but I like this photo because it shows the transition of the massive tree to the ancient path.  In a few months I should be able to post an update with all the finishing touches, but it will look a lot like this.

The base color for the room was a blue I mixed up from other paint cans I had around the house. We had moved a lot, and I read that as long as the paint is all the same base (you cannot mix latex and oil) and if it hasn’t mildewed, it’s ok to take old paint and mix it with other interior house paint to make a new color, keeping in mind that I always choose eggshell paints, the  resulting gloss was going to be what I wanted for durability vs. glare. I spent some time and testing mixing up a nice mid-tone blue with a touch of green and black to muddy it up a bit and keep it from overpowering the room. From an interior design standpoint, the colors of a room make a big impact on mood and the feeling of space – does the room look large and spacious or small, or cozy – exciting or soothing? That is what color can do for the interior. I wanted the blue to be soothing and mid-toned so the space would feel meditative and spacious. I knew the mural’s illusion of depth would help make the space feel larger if I did a good job on the perspective. I chose for all the lighting to come from the direction of the windows. Everything I painted, I made sure it had the same lighting direction – I often had to change it in my head from a reference photo with the wrong lighting – Joe’s videos were very helpful in this aspect as well – knowing how the light changes as it reflects and diffuses through foliage was really a huge help for me. I imagined the light coming from  the top center of the “window wall”.

The other trickiest bit that I knew the least about before starting this particular mural was the perspective. Unlike my prior murals which were much simpler, this one was quite a complex undertaking with a lot of imagination-fueled components. Thinking about perspective was really important to make it all feel like a real setting.  I needed a true understanding of how to place and convert each element to be the right size in the right place.  I averted a couple of total disasters using Joe’s trick of “halves and doubles”, plus estimates of how tall I thought each item would be and a little simple math in order to place some of the most intricate parts of the mural in the right places at the right sizes. With a little practice, I was able to make hundreds of elements come together into a plausible world. Thanks Joe for all the great instruction! I couldn’t have done this mural without your awesome videos!

Shama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree

Shama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree by Wendy RobertsShama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree
Oil on Canvas
12″ x 12″

Under-painting progress of Shama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree

Under-painting progress

Today I have finished a painting that I shared the early phases of on my Instagram account. 

Halfway done: progress of Shama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree

In-Progress view of Shama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree

I completed “Shama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree”, a piece meant to share the best aspects of one of my favorite hikes deep in the shade and protection of the lush Ko’olau Mountains.  In the background, you can see the same waterfall I featured in my prior piece, Sacred Space.  I love this waterfall because the rocks have a lot of character.  This time, the falls are not the star of the piece, but take a supporting role as the very real location where many white-rumped shama thrush live.  The shama thrush, its flowing tail a visual echo of the waterfall, perches in the branches of the mountain apple tree.  Here I have recreated the magical experience of finding the bright pink flowers of the mountain apple in full bloom.  If I could show it all in the same painting, I would depict how the petals carpet the ground with a layer of vivid pink, and I would paint the smell of the cool moss and the sound of the water.

 Shama are very curious birds and will often follow you, gliding from branch to branch for a long time as you hike, watching and listening to you as you walk through the trees.  As highly intelligent birds, they are not only keen observers, but also mimic birds to a limited extent, capable of learning short calls if you whistle to them repetitively.  If you are lucky, they will whistle the song back, quickly evolving your small tune into their own variation (4 or 5 notes is a good maximum if you are trying to teach them).  They may add clicks, chatters, trills, and melodic chirps until it blends seamlessly into their own repertoire.  Their voice is one of the sweetest of the island, with a clarity I would compare to the Meadow Larks of my childhood.  Some of my most unusual experiences with wild birds have been with shama thrushes.  If you are quiet and still, they will venture extremely close, and examine you carefully with their shiny black eyes. Unlike Snow White, I haven’t managed to convince them to help me with my laundry…yet.

Sacred Space

I have been quiet.  This is a sure sign that I have been working on something very large.  I am happy to unveil my latest piece: “Sacred Space” measuring 30″ x 48″ and what makes it such a large project is the level of detail.  Murals are larger, but they also get painted with large brushes.

Sacred Space by Wendy Roberts

Sacred Space complete with a frame from Brilhante Framing of Kailua

The idea for this piece hit me like a bolt of lightning 4 years ago when I had just watched “Secret of Kells” for the third time. “The Secret of Kells” is a cartoon so beautiful it should be thought of as a moving piece of art rather than what you would typically think of with animation.  It is about Celtic illuminated manuscripts and if you haven’t seen it, you should set aside a movie night to take a look.  It is a beautiful story with amazing animation. After viewing the amazing animated manuscripts once again, I wondered what tropical illuminated manuscripts would look like, and then after a few odd sketches of extremely stylized Hawaii scenery with a Celtic knotwork spin, the thought pushed into its final form: “What if I used metal leaf like paint to add movement to the water and the leaves – the sunlight dappling, changing, shifting like the light on the leafing?” I knew this had a potential to add another element to the painting, allowing me to more fully express the sense of awe felt while secluded next to a stunning waterfall. I had to learn how to use metal leaf and get good enough to apply it smoothly. That took about 2 years. Then it took a lot of time and care to work my way through the details on the canvas. I set it aside a few times to work on other things and allow my brain time to solve some quandries by passively working on them in the background.  I always returned with a fresh point of view. This will certainly not be the last “tropical leaf” painting! I am really interested in using the dynamic shimmer of metals in my work. I had to adjust for the variability of the silver leaf’s changing values, but the final effect adds motion and life that is impossible to show in a photo but I’ll try anyway by posting a detail from different angles.

Here is the ie ie vine in the painting, a woody endemic Hawaiian flower in the pandanus family, shown from two angles so you can see how the silver picks up and reflects light dynamically. You can also see a small portion of the waterfall’s silver leaf.

Giclees (durable canvas prints) of this piece will be available soon. It won’t have the leafing unfortunately since it has to be painted and blended into the rest of the piece, but when I get the final scan, I will be posting it on my “Giclees Available” page.

This piece will debut at the Punahou Carnival Art Show along with two of my little birds:

Akepa With Orange Ohia

Akepa with Orange Ohia

Saffron Finch In A Cannonball Tree by Wendy Roberts

Saffron Finch In A Cannonball Tree

A carnival?  You might find that odd.  Let me explain.  Hawaii has a handful of schools that function more like colleges.  They are rigorous, demand excellent grades, and inspire the kids who attend to really strive for their best potential.  Punahou is one of the largest of these.  They have a great scholarship program so that the school can admit kids who can benefit from the challenging education at a rate of payment their family can afford.  Every year, Punahou holds a carnival to bridge the gap between what the kids are able to pay and what the school demands to keep the facilities top notch.  Oddly enough, they have developed one of the largest, most prestigious art shows in the islands.  I am pleased to be participating. If these pieces are sold at the carnival, half the proceeds will go to the Punahou scholarship fund.  

Thoughts about the False Missile Alert

You probably heard the news about our false ballistic missile warning here in Hawaii. There was a lot of panic, but also a lot of cool heads too.  You don’t hear about the cool heads on the news.  It’s not very exciting compared to reporting about the very real panic a lot of people felt, but most of the people I know were concerned rather than panicked. Nonetheless, for those of us in the “concerned” category, it was still a very strange morning.  

 I woke up to the sound of my cell phone and my husband’s cell phone chirping in unison. The first thing I did was to wake up a touch annoyed.  We get flash flood alerts like that with the same alarm, so I thought they were going to tell us it was a flash flood.  I was preparing to roll over and go back to sleep, but then I saw the screen.  The missile alert was on the screen like the graphic below (this image is thanks to Tulsi Gabbard, who you will hear about later on):

Like a dope, I got up out of bed and went to look at the sky because I am not a good morning person and it took about 20 seconds for me to realize that of course I wasn’t going to see the missiles – they take 15 minutes to arrive. All I could think of was “bzzzzzzz” (the brain equivalent of TV static) and then after another minute of squinting into the sky and trying to be sentient, I thought “How do I prepare for this?  Hmmm….”  I realized you can’t prepare for something like that past what you would do for a hurricane, and I was already passable with my emergency kit, so no need to worry about that aspect.  I remember being relieved and a bit embarrassed that I couldn’t think of any unfinished business or last desperate wishes that could be fulfilled in 15 minutes other than filling the bathtub with water. It made me feel uncreative.  Some people have the wackiest ideas of what to do with their last few moments of life, but I, who make my living being creative, drew a blank.  I also thought it was weird that North Korea would actually send a missile. I know they are always threatening, but they have lots of reasons NOT to actually go through with it – in fact it’s highly unlikely if you sift through the pros and cons.  Then I realized no sirens were blaring.  “Let’s check it out on Twitter to see if it’s false!”  The lack of sirens was fishy. 

 

If there is one thing I have learned from being a night owl, it is that if you have a weird earthquake at 3 am, Twitter is the best place to figure out if other people know what is happening.  I don’t know what kind of magical server is running over there, but the second something bizarre happens, you can start searching for information, and usually you will have your answer in under 5 minutes from a reliable source – technology is wonderful!  I ran to Twitter to figure out what was going on with this alarm, and immediately got the word it was false from our local hero of the day, Tulsi Gabbard, who immediately confirmed the status of the alarm and sent out a very quick Tweet.

Many of us had moments after it was all over where we realized our lives were the everyday humdrum and we were so grateful!  It’s NICE to be stuck in traffic (sort of). It’s nice to fold laundry and have a list of errands.  It is a luxury to have routine everyday life unfolding. It is nice to know you have kissed your kids and given your family notification on a regular basis that you love them.  I felt squared away and spared and happy to be sweeping the floor. And I am also grateful to be able to take all the everyday stuff for granted too.  It’s nice to be able to relax into it rather than having to be acutely aware of all the beauty and all the multitudes of blessings we have in our lives every moment of the day.  I am grateful for the ability to take it all for granted.  That’s part of the charm of the “everyday” too.

Quality Time at ZAFA Workshops

This October an November I have been honing my skills, I took an amazing workshop at Zwick Academy of Fine Art (ZAFA) entitled “Master Copy Workshop”. We worked on a master painting copy of a work by John Singer Sargent – I chose “Lady Agnew” I am mostly done copying the detail, and ready to show the results.  First we worked on the value study.  This turned out to be quite enlightening for understanding the overall tones of the piece.  It was years since I had worked with charcoal, and I found out I really love it for a drawing medium.

Then we worked on color studies (not pictured), before launching into the real deal. We used a nice color print out in lieu of being able to spend a month in front of the actual paintings. Every time I mixed a skin tone, I found myself saying “Needs more purple!” Sargent is a surprisingly saturated colorist.  I look forward to the changes this will bring to future pieces as I incorporate the lessons learned by studying Sargent’s careful yet expressive painting style which I would classify as “effort-filled effortlessness”.  I can highly recommend William Zwick’s classes.  He’s an excellent teacher! I learned more in less time by doing this master copy under his mentorship than I would have if I had picked up a brush and done it without guidance. Maybe I will end up doing more copies in the future, and I would even dare to do them solo now, but I think the process of being guided through this copy helps me know how I would go about it in the future if left to my own devices. It takes a lot of research if you plan to replicate the painting down to the technique and palette.  I was grateful to have that footwork in place already for this piece.

There is a little glare on the photo, but I think it is not hampering the viewing of my copy too much.  Also, the piece is not varnished yet.  I will post again when I have the necklace done and the varnish done (which will deepen the colors), but you can see that the detail is almost complete.  I am planning to frame this and hang it in my studio to remind me how to soften my edges.  What a great way to spend October of 2017!

I returned to ZAFA in November to work on my master copy-earned skills with some life painting sessions, and painted a portrait of the absolutely gorgeous model posing at ZAFA for the week.

Here she is with her painting. Posing for hours like that is not easy.  She did a great job of standing still for the 9 hours (!) it took us all to paint her likeness.

I worked hard to soften the edges and was pleased with the results, as was the model who bought the piece – I always love it when a painting finds its home.  ZAFA is one of the few places you can go on Oahu for a multi-session life painting experience, which I highly recommend if you are looking to hone skills and learn to paint beyond the confines of a a photo.  As of 2017, it is on Fridays and you can sign up with ZAFA to get notice of the status of the sessions.  We are lucky to have high quality art resources like this close at hand. Maybe I will see you there, fellow Oahu artists! 

 

Miniature Shows for November/December 2017

This November and December, I am getting a chance to show my works from September’s miniature work frenzy.  I had 4 pieces accepted into the AHA Miniature Show which ran throughout November, and 3 were juried in are still on display at the Koa Gallery.  Details are here for the Koa Gallery Show which is still on display:  http://www.wendyrobertsfineart.com/event/mixed-media-miniature-show/

At the AHA Miniature show:

Akepa With Orange Ohia

Akepa with Orange Ohia

Hawaiian Moorhen

Mynah Bird in a Coral Tree by Wendy Roberts

Mynah Bird in a Coral Tree

Violet Vanda Orchids

Violet Vanda Orchids

Mixed Media Miniature Show 20th Anniversary:

Java Sparrows in an Avocado Tree by Wendy Roberts

Java Sparrows in an Avocado Tree

Iiwi on Blue Lobeliads by Wendy Roberts

Iiwi on Blue Lobeliads

Saffron Finch in a Cannonball Tree by Wendy Roberts

Saffron Finch in a Cannonball Tree