Wahi Pana Exhibit is up until July 5 – Many Thanks!

The Wahi Pana exhibit is up right now as I write this – the reception came and went in a blur! I tended the show and gave tours a lot during the first week. I truly thought I would have more time to keep everyone up to date on the status of the exhibit while it was still an “upcoming exhibit”, but it turns out that this exhibit was a full-time job for several months  and it ramped up to a fever pitch for me right before the reception as I struggled to finish the vinyl signage and the website, wahi-pana.com.  Thus, I sent out a quick social media alert about the reception, but now I want to follow it up here and invite you to the exhibit.  Wahi Pana: A Sense of Place is on display until July 5.  It is spectacular!  So many excellent paintings that display a true connection to the land and the history that make Hawaii unique. 

Personally, I will be sitting 2 more times: Thursday, June 27, 2019 10:30 – 1 pm, and July 3, 2019, 1 pm – 4:30 pm.  If you are not able to come at those particular times, but would still like to have me show you around, please contact me. There are always artists at the gallery, giving visitors information and adding a personal touch to the display.

Here is the work I created for this exhibit with an explanation of what it means:  http://wahi-pana.com/wendy-roberts 

You can also view a video covering the overall concept of the exhibit.  I dusted off my video editing skills again to create a little overview of the exhibit’s concept.  

I have a little clip in the middle. 

There were a lot of people involved in the success of this exhibit.  I am nervous to begin thanking everyone because I know I may end up leaving someone out, but I really want to write this.  I was not one of the speakers at the reception and this would have probably made a lousy speech, and you can’t put hyperlinks in a talk either – so this is a better format anyway.  I really have so much gratitude toward so many people!  Here goes:

Thank you to our sponsors. Their generous donations of time and services made this exhibit possible.  To the Peter Drewliner and the Charles E Higa Foundation for a generous financial gift, Edward Enterprises Printing for donating labor on our beautiful catalog, Chromaco, Inc Fine Art Printing for our awards,  Associa Inc, and Insurance Associates, and Kimberly Howsley of Aloha Tuscany Studios for financial support.

Thank you to our educators, Kumu Glen Kila, Kumu Joe Recca, Kumu Shirley Recca, Dr. Paul Brennan, and Kamaka Pili.  Thank you to all our online educators – many of whose names are hard to find.  If your project is on our education page, it was part of our success. You inspired us with your knowledge of these sacred, important locations.

Thank you most of all to Dawn Yoshimura, the curator of the exhibit.  The exhibit would not exist without her.  This was her baby and she has worked so hard! I do not think anyone has seen the hundreds of hours she donated to the art community because she was overseeing the entire project and doing a large share of the work herself for 5 months (plus the proposal writing time too!).  She was the one who pitched the idea and lead us all the way through the design of the show and all the ambitious side projects: panels, discussions, education, etc…  She spent the most time of anyone on this project – and that is saying a lot!  Time she could have spent at the easel has been spent in connecting and guiding us all to make something greater than the sum of our parts.  This is by far the most detailed, far-reaching, community-oriented art event I have been involved in helping to organize.  It was all-consuming for me, and even moreso for Dawn.  The care and the time really does show in the final exhibit. Some artists have continued their work on series inspired by this exhibit. The influence from this experience will ripple throughout the islands for a long time…

Thank you to Kimberly Howsley for her help as president of AHA and co-chair.  She spent many hours editing, planning, and honing the exhibit, and was especially involved in the panels and extra community events. Thanks to her husband Roger, and fried Richard for their help with tasks especially leading up to the reception! I apologize that I only know first names in this case, but they were so kind to help us!

Thank you to HoMA Director of Curatorial Affairs Healoha Johnston for selecting the concept, and to Exhibit Manager Marlene Siu for hours and hours of coordination with the museum, for helping us communicate with the museum’s teams of graphic designers and web developers.  Everyone in the museum team did a wonderful job of helping us bring this exhibit to the larger community.  Between AHA and Museum publicity, a crowd of over 200 people showed up for the reception – HOMAS Gallery (Linekona) was standing room only with many people in the hallways!

Thank you to William Zwick for hours spent in painting and hanging the exhibit with Dawn. You two chose a great color of green and I can see the square feet of paint and hours you spent to perfect the exhibit. Every piece is in harmony in its place with its neighbors.

Thank you to Martina for the gorgeous flowers!  Your time and aloha really shone through the beauty of the arrangements and lei.  The lei I wore at the reception is the most beautiful lei I have ever worn!  It was memorable and extravagant!  The artist participant lei were unique and wonderful!  I have mine hanging in a tree so the Pele’s hair can grow.

Thank you to MaryAnne Long for being our emcee, for helping to communicate with the art community via many email blasts, for helping us get an article out in the Midweek Voice, for all your help at the reception, and for hours of editing help on various written materials. You are so multi-talented!

Thank you to Jui-Lien for a beautiful graphic design contribution.  She took the logo and the composite images I created and gave them a cohesive unifying color scheme that inspired everything we did after that initial poster design. Beautiful work! Aslo, she helped us with publicity to a degree I could not have duplicated.

Thank you to Jessica Orfe for her tireless help with promotion – placing posters and postcards, and early design work too! As mentioned, the crowd we drew was thanks in part to your energy and enthusiasm.

Thank you to James Hsu for keeping track of a flurry of treasury activity and writing out who knows how many reimbursement checks for the many details of this exhibit in a timely fashion.

Thank you Liz Corbin for spearheading the refreshments – it was elegantly done! Thank you Adriana Franc, Frances Wong, Barbara Sumida, Linda Umstead, Beth Anderson, and Marilyn Luipold for assistance with the refreshments and cleanup on a hot day where all the punch was gone by the end of the reception!

Thank you to Joe Kingston for the beautiful live music!  It’s always a pleasure to hear you play!

Thank you to the 45 other artists for your excellent work!  I can tell there was a lot of thought and intention placed into the work you created.  It is a very special exhibit because you each took the time to read the prospectus, participate in the process, and follow all the guidelines.  I know some of the requirements must have seemed arbitrary before the show, but at least for me, seeing the results hanging in the gallery, I am glad Dawn had the foresight to create the small touches that add a cohesive look to the overall exhibit.  Thank you all for sitting the show as well.  Your time is truly appreciated!  I know it’s a long list, but I want to go ahead and name the participants here with the link to their art on the wahi-pana.com site.

Beth Anderson http://wahi-pana.com/beth-anderson 
Su Shen Atta http://wahi-pana.com/su-shen-atta 
Suzanne Barnes http://wahi-pana.com/suzanne-barnes 
Lynne Boyer http://wahi-pana.com/lynne-boyer
Dottie Brennan http://wahi-pana.com/dorothy-brennan 
Mark Brown http://wahi-pana.com/mark-brown 
Spencer Chang http://wahi-pana.com/spencer-chang 
Carol D’Angelo http://wahi-pana.com/carol-dangelo 
Dennis Daniel http://wahi-pana.com/dennis-daniel 
Dexter Doi http://wahi-pana.com/dexter-doi 
Kelley Fitzgerald http://wahi-pana.com/kelley-fitzgerald 
Leslie Fleming http://wahi-pana.com/leslie-fleming 
Adriana Franc http://wahi-pana.com/adriana-franc 
David Friedman http://wahi-pana.com/david-friedman 
Harumi Fujimoto http://wahi-pana.com/harumi-fujimoto 
Bonnie Sol Hahn http://wahi-pana.com/bonnie-sol-hahn 
James Hsu http://wahi-pana.com/james-hsu 
Kimberly Howsley http://wahi-pana.com/kimberly-howsley 
Helen Iaea http://wahi-pana.com/helen-iaea 
Kari Lisa Johnson http://wahi-pana.com/kari-lisa-johnson
MaryAnne Long http://wahi-pana.com/maryanne-long 
David Luchak http://wahi-pana.com/david-luchak 
Marilyn Luipold http://wahi-pana.com/marilyn-luipold 
Yvonne Manipon http://wahi-pana.com/yvonne-manipon 
Sherree McKellar http://wahi-pana.com/sherree-mckellar 
Tamara Moan http://wahi-pana.com/tamara-moan 
Peter Murray http://wahi-pana.com/peter-murray 
Frank Oliva http://wahi-pana.com/frank-oliva 
Jessica Orfe http://wahi-pana.com/jessica-orfe 
Susan Phillips http://wahi-pana.com/susan-phillips 
Madalyn Purcell http://wahi-pana.com/madalyn-purcell 
Joy Ritchey http://wahi-pana.com/joy-ritchey 
Jennifer Rothschild Bruns http://wahi-pana.com/jennifer-rothschild-bruns 
Jui-Lien Sanderson http://wahi-pana.com/jui-lien-sanderson 
Warren Stenberg http://wahi-pana.com/warren-stenberg
Barbara Sumida http://wahi-pana.com/barbara-sumida 
Jimmy Tablante http://wahi-pana.com/jimmy-tablante 
Linh Tang http://wahi-pana.com/linh-tang 
Roger Tinius http://wahi-pana.com/roger-tinius 
Diane Tunnell http://wahi-pana.com/diane-tunnell 
Linda Umstead http://wahi-pana.com/linda-umstead  (who was also our prior president and gave the initial encouragement to Dawn to pursue this exhibit. We appreciate your spirit of support and positive energy!)
Vikki Wetle http://wahi-pana.com/vikki-wetle 
Jenee Wonderlich http://wahi-pana.com/jenee-wonderlich 
Frances Wong http://wahi-pana.com/frances-wong 
Dawn Yoshimura http://wahi-pana.com/dawn-yoshimura

We appreciate our AHA artists Edd Harnas, and Liz Corbin, who have also volunteered to help sit the show with us in solidarity. We managed to fill all the time slots thanks to our generous artists!  

As many names as are here, it is not everyone – especially if you were on the museum teams for the facility, security, parking or the graphics/publicity team.  I wish I could list you all by name.  I know it took time to write the blog, compile the articles,  submit copy to chase down third party publicity, to list it on the calendar, to fix the lighting in place for the gallery and the hall, to make sure the gallery is secure each day and every night.  There is a whole crew of extremely kind maintenance, exhibits, and security teams who help us with physical logistics.  The parking team saved us many headaches by being willing to help us with our passes.  Thank you everyone, truly! Without all the collaboration, this would not have all come together.  This was truly a huge community effort in which every stroke from every paddle has helped us approach the destination!  Mahalo nui loa! 

Planning the Wahi Pana Exhibit

Waikiki through time: On the left, rural 1800s Waikiki as depicted in the painting Diamond Head, Waikiki Beach, and Helumoa by Charles Furneaux blended with a modern photo courtesy of Christopher Chappelear, Composite image by Wendy Roberts

 

Now that the busy holiday season is over, and Punahou Carnival has come and gone, it is time to focus on spring and summer display plans. This spring and summer are going to be very exciting! Fellow artist and good friend Dawn Yoshimura created a thought-provoking exhibit concept for Association of Hawaii Artists (AHA), and also a second excellent concept for Hawaii Watercolor Society. Amazingly, both ideas were accepted by Honolulu Art Museum, and thus, HWS will be busy working on their exhibit, while a group of us from AHA are working on our exhibit, simultaneously bringing these two beautiful ideas to fruition. Having both proposals accepted is quite a honor and an accomplishment for Dawn. Now she is putting her energy into making the AHA exhibit a reality.

I am involved with the AHA exhibit, a prestigious curated show for AHA which will give local artists a chance to show their love of the beautiful islands we live on. Working with Dawn, and AHA’s new president, Kimberly Howsley, we drafted the initial prospectus and associated plans for the upcoming event and exhibit for AHA. The title is: Wahi Pana: A Sense of Place. “Wahi pana” is a special term in Hawaiian. It roughly translates to “the pulse of a place”. It’s quite an amazing imagery. Perhaps the most intimate marking of time we each experience is the pulse of our own hearts. To extend that intimate, universal sense of time to a specific special location is to extend the bounds of our bodies and our senses into the natural world surrounding us. To me, it shows the beautiful reverence for nature that is present in the names and sayings of the Hawaiian culture and language. The important things that happen over the course of time add to the mana or energy of the place. To know the story of a location is to develop a deeper understanding of the feeling you might get when you step into a certain part of the island.

Pali Outlook 1800s to Modern Day: Pali Highway is one of the arteries for modern traffic moving to and from Honolulu and the windward side. It was once a path for Hawaiian villagers and later farmers to bring food by foot and later by cart from farms on the rural windward side over to Honolulu. Vintage photo courtesy of Kailua Historical Society, modern photo and composite by Wendy Roberts.

The Wahi Pana: A Sense of Place exhibit will consist of a historical education session for all artists on a selected location (the are 1 – 3 locations per Hawaiian Island). Over the weekend of March 8 – 10, artists will be meeting in a limited selection of special historical areas to create art on site. This will foster community and more richly illustrate the way different artists experience the same places. The resulting art will be curated to assure quality with a desire to show the diversity of work created by artists living and working in the islands now. Dawn’s underlying question is whether knowing the history and lore of a specific location will enrich or change the appearance or focus of art done on site where artists can feel the energy of the area and remember the stories they have been told. She is an ardent plein air watercolor painter, and it is inevitable root that her concept grew from. This habit of painting regularly outdoors is widespread among a variety of media (oil painter, pastel artists, etc…) especially here in Hawaii where the weather allows for painting outside year-round. The art in the exhibit will not all be paintings and drawings. Other media can be adapted to be created at least partially on-site, so hopefully we will have a variety of lovely 2D and 3D pieces with a palpable sense of place. The show will center on the feeling that stems from first-hand observation and familiarity with the artist’s chosen location. I suspect for many artists the educational segment really will deepen the sense of these locations being unique, and special to history. In turn, perhaps the locations will be more meaningful to the artist as well.

As of this writing, on February 3, 2019, there is a website (wrangling the website will be one of my biggest contributions to the show). It is destined to grow with time into a more comprehensive and information-rich part of the exhibit. Right now, it is mostly geared toward artists, spelling out the concept and presenting the prospectus and calendar. We are trying to spread news of this opportunity throughout the islands. As time goes forth, the site will transform into an online catalog and documentation that augments the exhibit for visitors to the gallery. The address is: www.wahi-pana.com. I will certainly mention it again in the months to come, and expect to be posting a few updates on Instagram and Facebook as the events unfold. Hopefully one of my pieces will be part of the exhibit as well.

Street Art Hawaii Kaimuki Beautification Project

On Saturday 22 and 23, a group of artists volunteered to beautify the traffic boxes in Kaimuki.  Though I was only able to participate for one day, I was able to finish a very large (6′ X 10′ in all) traffic box mural on the corner of Waialae Ave and 16th Street – right next to a bus stop. It was a great experience and the neighborhood was very supportive and appreciative!

The design process began with a sketch a couple of weeks prior.  It’s rough, but you can see I stuck fairly close to the plan, just adding a few more native and Polynesian-introduced plants when I found out that the extremely nice family living close to the box would know and enjoy having more plants on the traffic box.  It turned out the neighbor adjacent was an avid gardener and bird aficionado, and they will be looking at this box all the time, so I wanted to make a special adjustment as a thank you to them for their unusually kind hospitality.  They even brewed me a cup of tea using leaves from their own garden! 

If you look at the box in person, make sure to peek at the back.  I painted all the sides – the back was just as important as the front.  The back is inspired by the name of this neighborhood – Kaimuki.  Ka imu ki means “ti plant oven”.  It was an area famous for the many ti plant ovens on its hills.  The ti plant was a very important and useful plant to the Hawaiians.  It is still in heavy use today as the raw material for hula skirts, lei, and also as a leaf that can be used to cook. Hau, a plant used for medicine and for fiber for tough ropes is also on the back.  I painted a lot of taro on the front and sides which is a Hawaiian staple food that is often growing wild in wetland areas.  Finally, I painted pickleweed, pohuehue, a small fern that looks like a 4-leaf clover, and a wild pink hibiscus, all plants that preceded human settlement.

The finished piece was accomplished after a very touching Hawaiian blessing. I felt the power of the ceremony followed me throughout the day, inspiring an unusually productive painting pace.  I skipped lunch to race the sun, moving around the box as the shade moved.  I enjoyed talking to various visitors throughout the work day, especially meeting a lot of the neighbors.  This area really has strong community feeling.  Despite the major road, the neighbors know and care about one another.  Many have lived there a long time.  I was treated exceedingly kindly all day long – countless shakas, “mahalos!”, and nice comments from passing cars, and neighbors offering juice or chocolate milk, etc…  I cannot thank the community of Kaimuki enough for the aloha spirit they showed during this process.  It was very heart warming and made me really want to do this project justice!    

I am very grateful to Jennifer Noel (the organizer), Bill Brizee, and Tracy Brilhante for getting me involved with this project and helping to make it all work.  Thank you to the Kaimuki neighbors who were so supportive and grateful for the project.  They made all the artists feel like a million dollars!  Thank you to the following photographers who kindly posted photos of native birds and flowers online in creative commons like Flickr Commons and Wikimedia Commons to allow for accurate reference photos for this project:  Dan Clark, David Eickhoff, Forest and Kim Starr, John and Karen Hollingsworth, and Rick Obst.  Without the lovely photos I could not have made the various Hawaiian Moorhens and plants as believable. Mahalo nui loa to all.  I hope the traffic box will brighten the area and be something the neighbors enjoy seeing.

  

Ultra Exhibit I

Ultra Exhibit I at Pauahi Tower Lobby
(lobby is the second floor – up the escalators)
Dates: March 3 – August 3, 2018
Open from 6 am – 6 pm on weekdays, Saturdays 8 am – 2 pm; Closed Sunday
Location: 1003 Bishop St, Honolulu, HI 96813
Parking entrance is on the left at approximately 1080 Alakea Street (Bishop Square Parking), or you may park in public parking at Alii Place across the street if you prefer a slightly cheaper option with a small walk.
Artists Reception: Thursday, May 17, 4 pm – 6 pm

Peaceful Sanctuary

Three of my art pieces are in the Ultra Exhibit at Pauahi Tower.  The Ultra Exhibit is named for the large pieces and the unusually long time period in this “ultra” venue – Pauahi Tower, which has a gorgeous travertine marble lobby with soaring ceilings somewhere greater than 20 feet high. We are so thankful to Douglas Emmett and the Pauahi Security team for their permission and support for this show, and to Katherine Love, our curator who ranked and juried the pieces so that we had an impartial decision of which pieces were on display first.
 

Shama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree

Shama Thrush in a Mountain Apple Tree

I serve as show chair for this very long show – it will be 5 months for stage I and at least 5 months for stage II (which will be entitled Ultra Exhibit II).  It’s been an experience that has cemented my confidence in organizing and running a large show, and it continues to take time and ingenuity to readjust the way the art is hung with every sale (because of frequent sales which is absolutely wonderful!)  I don’t put the new art in the same place as the one that just sold.  An show is about the way pieces interact with the neighboring images.  Every piece deserves a chance to be seen, so the paintings must be carefully arranged and re-arranged to give a harmonious grouping where every piece draws your eye in turn. I find on average that I can usually find a way to move three or four pieces to ensure the best look to the show, but it’s very tricky to know which pieces will look good together. I decided to use Photoshop to aid me in my quest for the best hanging scheme.   I have scale models of each wall and all 60+ pieces in the show.  I use them like digital paper dolls to arrange the work.  It saves me hours – especially since I am unable to see every wall at the same time.  This is a vast display space! 

Sacred Space

The public is invited to come to our reception. There are 27 artists in the show. I am not sure if they will all be able to come, but I hope so! If you would like to come but you don’t know what an art show is like, don’t let it intimidate you. You can read my handy guide to attending a reception here: How to Attend an Artists Reception  Below I have posted a handy postcard with all the info you need to join us. We will hope to see you there!

Easy Paint Party: Waterlilies

I am teaching an easy, fun, paint party themed around an interpretation of one of Monet’s recurring color schemes.

Brilhante Custom Framing and Art
1247 Kailua Rd #2a in Kailua
May 12, 2018 starting at 5:00 pm
Call to reserve a spot:  (808) 263-1096  

Pricing is $45 (plus or minus $5 – Brilhante can confirm the exact price).  This time we will be replicating a color harmony present in one of Monet’s waterlily paintings.  We will work on color mixing and painting wet in wet.  That is extra challenging in acrylic with its quick dry time. Acrylic is versatile and can act like watercolor or oil paint depending on how you handle it.  I will be sharing tips and tricks to get your paint to behave a little more like oil paint for the majority of this painting.  Most of all, we will aim to be joyful and expressive with our strokes, perfect for a fun and easy night.

Monet painted around 250 waterlily paintings.  They usually feature a large view of his exquisite garden.  Someone said he was a “gardener who could also paint”.  I found that quite a delightful description of his massive skill with the garden.  Because we are making this easy, we are going to “zoom in” and focus on two flowers and some lily pads with just a hint of peachy clouds at the top. 

There are a myriad of sophisticated color combos in Monet’s gorgeous paintings, but I chose a pinks/greens/blues scheme, focusing especially on the bottom of this painting:

These similar blues, greens and pinks appear in other works as well, so I think he was rather fond of this bright and lovely color relationship. The top of this next painting is nearly identical in color.

Image credit: Google Arts and Culture  https://artsandculture.google.com/asset/water-lilies/1QFVEEzvlmrVzg

Here is a softer, lighter version that is still a similar relationship of colors, especially near the bottom right corner: Image Credit:  Painting “Nympheas” by Claude Monet – Neue Pinakothek, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3334951

 

Fun, Easy, Painting Party Class at Brilhante in Kailua

It’s time for another fun painting party class at Brilhante!  This painting is “Sunset Hibiscus”  I will teach everyone how to paint an Pua Aloalo yellow hibiscus (the state flower) in front of a sunset sky and water.

November 4, 2017 (Saturday) 5:30 – 8 pm
Brilhante Custom Framing & Fine Art
1247 Kailua Rd #2a, Kailua, HI 96734
$40 (we supply all the materials)
Please bring an appetizer or drink to share

Although painting will begin at 6 pm, it’s best to come at 5:30 so you can meet everyone, eat a snack, and get relaxed before we start painting.  The cost per person is $40 which includes all painting materials. You need only bring a snack of some sort to share, and the rest is set up! We are going to have a good time! 


We always have a cap of 12 people when I teach at Brilhante, so I can really customize and scale the painting to be appropriate for a wide range of artists from the beginner that hasn’t touched a brush since grade school, to the intermediate painter. We always have the full range of skill levels present in our parties, so don’t be afraid to come no matter how much or little you have painted.  I design these paintings for a wide range of skills and assure that everyone will have good time and hopefully learn a few skills by the end of the night. I am able to give a lot of guidance and help you respond to spontaneous changes you make to the painting.  It is fun and relaxing to be creative in a group! We each bring something to share like a bottle of wine or a party food, and we relax and let the paint flow. I truly enjoy teaching in this laid back party setting!

This class will be about value and getting the most vibrant color from your paints on the petals.  Along the way we will learn a nice wet-in-wet technique to get a smooth sunset, some glazing, and a bit about color and what makes this painting work as an image.

If you want to join in, please call Tracy at Brilhante Custom Framing and Gallery at (808) 263-1096 to reserve a spot. It almost always sells out (as of 10/26/2017, two days after we really started announcing it, there are 6 spots left). It’s best to call soon if you want to come.

Leukemia Society Fundraiser

I am participating in the upcoming fundraiser for the Lymphoma Leukemia Society at the McKellar Residence: 148 Kaimoani Way, Kailua, Hawaii, 96734, this weekend, Sunday October 29, 2017 from 2 – 5 pm.  I will personally be late since I am also taking a workshop but I do plan to come from 4 – 5.  There will be art for sale with a minimum of 50% of all proceeds going to the Leukemia Society.  Many accomplished artists are donating work to the event, and Greg and Junko (an award-winning steel drum band) will play live music for us at this lovely beachside home!  Please see this flyer for more information:

Leukemia Fundraiser

I would also urge anyone who feels altruistic to get signed up as a possible marrow donor.  Someone amazing did this for my uncle.  I was thinking of testing for compatibility when a kind stranger matched him before I could even find out how to sign up.  Later, I signed up in the hopes to pay it forward someday.  Maybe I will be the stranger with the right marrow to help make extra years possible for someone as wonderful as my uncle. He was seriously ill, but was fortunate to recover well after the bone marrow transplant.  He has been granted precious years of life to nuture his grandkids and spend time with friends and family. 

Please click here to learn the basics of what it means to sign up in the database and what it would require to be a donor:

https://bethematch.org/transplant-basics/how-marrow-donation-works/steps-of-bone-marrow-or-pbsc-donation/

If you are between the ages of 18 and 44, you are the right age to be the match. With a simple cheek swab, you can be in the database, and if a match comes up, you can make the decision of whether you are able to donate marrow.   Please visit this link to learn how to take the first step to being in the database (a DNA swab to determine compatibility with future patients):

https://join.bethematch.org/sidenavjoin

With Hawaii, there are many unique racial combinations, and so it’s important especially here in Hawaii to register since the need for marrow often follows racial/hereditary lines. and it is harder for multiracial patients to be able to match. Someone on the island with wonderful diverse heritage could be the key to help a Filipino/Hawaiian/Japanese/Native American/Irish mixed ancestry patient that would otherwise be unable to find a match.

 

 

New Show: By Land or By Sea

I am a participating artist in the newest Honolulu Country Club Show: “By Land or Sea”. It’s a group show featuring around 15 artists.  The show will run from February 26, 2017 to April 9, 2017 at Honolulu Country Club, 1690 Ala Puumalu St., Honolulu 96818

You are invited to come enjoy the reception, March 5, 2017, 5:00 – 7:00 PM.  If you have never been to an artist’s reception before, you’re welcome to read my post about how to attend an artist’s reception.

Peaceful Sanctuary by Wendy Roberts

Peaceful Sanctuary

Fiery Sunset by Wendy Roberts

Fiery Sunset

I have two pieces on display at the show, “Peaceful Sanctuary” and “Fiery Sunset”. One for land, and one for sea seemed right.

I am looking forward to seeing the completed show.  I normally stay to help hang the artwork, but this weekend was unusually busy so I had to drop it off and leave before the hanging even began.

I really like the Honolulu Country Club as a venue. It’s a very beautiful building on picture-perfect grounds! I hope to see you there!

 

How to Attend an Artist’s Reception

Artists Reception Refreshments WAG 2016

Artists Reception Refreshments

I used to think I wasn’t allowed to go to artists receptions without receiving a specific invitation in the mail.

I remember very clearly the first Artist’s reception I attended.  It was for my Dad’s solo show at Springville Museum of Art in the mid-nineties. Since my Dad was quadriplegic, he had stopped attending art openings long before I could recall due to his health, so he had only one artist’s reception that I remember.  Because it was one of his only events, and he was very ill, I think many people guessed correctly that it would be his last art show as well. Although it was announced in the newspaper, I really didn’t think about the logistics much.  I just knew the upper floor of the museum held quite a crowd. I’m not sure how many people were there, but I know it was an unusually large crowd.  I remember seeing family, classmates of his from high school, neighbors, friends.  Even some people he hadn’t seen in years attended. Many people were dressed up very nicely.  It felt more like a wedding than a gallery reception in many ways.

It was a lovely event, but somehow I concluded that art receptions were only for people who know the artist. I figured I wasn’t allowed to go to an artist’s reception if I wasn’t a personal friend. Now that I have attended many artists receptions (my own and others), I know that for most of the art receptions in Hawaii, my ideas were absolutely incorrect! I would like to encourage you to attend artists receptions, even if you don’t know any of the artists.  If it looks interesting, you should go. They are truly meant to be parties for the public. We want to see our existing friends/family AND meet new people. We love it when people take to time to see the show we worked hard to put together.

Artists Reception AHA 2016

Artists Reception AHA 2016: Most art shows have an approximately 10 minute presentation of awards and/or quick acknowledgement of the organizers and/or artist.

The real deal with art shows:

Unless there are specific invitations with specific instructions, this is the way artists receptions run:

1. Everyone is welcome.

Artists receptions are like a big, open house type party and really, crowds are a gift.  You can bring friends. You don’t have to know the artist.

2. Dress comfortably

You don’t have to dress nicely, but you can if you like.

3. Enjoy the refreshments

There are almost always light refreshments and drinks.  Yes, you can eat and drink them even if you don’t know the artist.  Go ahead – that’s why we have a refreshment table – for ALL our guests.

4. You are not obligated to buy art

You are not expected to buy something – you can certainly do so if you like, but it’s never an obligation.

5. Stay as long as you like

You can stay for part of the night, or the whole time.

6. Please don’t take it personally if your conversation with the artist is short or interrupted.

I am always trying to strike that perfect balance between visiting with everyone and swapping meaningful conversation for as long as possible.  I never manage to talk to everyone, and inevitably, at least a couple of conversations are cut short. I always wish I had more time.

7. Basic human decency is great.

As long as you don’t destroy the art, act in a rude fashion, or drink all the wine and get wasted, you’re going to fit in just fine!

8. You don’t have to be an art expert to attend.

If you don’t know much about art, you are not alone.  There are always plenty of people who come to support the artist in their life, and their attendance doesn’t center around the art.  Likewise, some people know a lot about art, but don’t know anyone. There are lots of reasons to go to a reception.  No one is expecting you to write an art review for the local paper in which you identify intriguing parallels to 15th century Italian art.

9. Just go.

If you see a show in the newspaper or on an online events calendar that you think would be fun to view, try to go on the artist’s reception night.  It will be full of energy and people.  Sometimes there is live music.  It really is like a wonderful party you didn’t have to plan.  Feel free to “crash” an art reception anytime.  And if you like the work, find the artist and say something nice.  Sign the guestbook, and enjoy the ambiance.

Windward Artists Guild 57th Annual Member Show Photos

The 57th Annual Member Show for the Windward Artists Guild is now at Hoomaluhia Gallery.  I have a couple of photos of the gallery to share.  This is not remotely comprehensive, just a quick overview. You’ll want to see a lot of the work close up and in person.  This show has a lot of pieces that don’t photograph well: collage with beautiful foils and transparent, hand dyed papers; encaustic work that always has a lot of glare in photos but is luminous and vivid in person; and work protected behind glass, its brilliance obscured in photos by inevitable glare.  These works can only be appreciated fully in person.  See the show before October 28, 2016 at Hoomaluhia Botanical Gardens in Kaneohe, and while you’re at it, pack a picnic.  The garden is breathtaking!

Windward Artists Guild 57th Annual Member Show 2016 at Hoomaluhia

Entry Wall of the show

Windward Artists Guild 57th Annual Member Show 2016 at Hoomaluhia Panorama

Panorama from the center of the room

Windward Artists Guild 57th Annual Member Show 2016 at Hoomaluhia Wendy Roberts

Wendy with “Understory” and “Waterlilies”

Meanwhile in the garden just outside, nature is proving that even the cloudy days are gorgeous at Hoomaluhia!

Hoomaluhia Visitor Center

Hoomaluhia Visitor Center

Near the Hoomaluhia Gallery

Trail adjacent to the Hoomaluhia Gallery

Hoomaluhia Heliconia 2016

My favorite plant blooming right now: These yellow heliconia blooming near the gallery are around 3 feet long and fuzzy! The whole plant with its beautiful leaves stretches at least 12 feet, (probably more like 15 feet) tall!

The reception for the show is coming up this weekend on Saturday, October 8, 2016 at from 5 – 7 pm.  We hope to see you there!